News Splash™

Pelagic Odontoceti Research Project

Pelagic Odontoceti Research Project Kick Offs with GoFundMe Campaign

 

Through our Research Scientist Program, we have progressing on our new Pelagic Odontoceti Research Project led by our Research Coordinator, Josh McInnes.

Odonotcete's are any whale of the suborder Odontoceti, such as dolphins, porpoises, killer whales (largest dolphin species), and others characterized by an asymmetrical skull, a single blowhole, and rows of teeth. 

DonateButtonGofundme

The project consists of collecting data on photo-identification, occurrence patterns, and foraging behavior of toothed cetaceans inhabiting the waters of the Pacific Northwest.
Two areas we are comparing are Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (MBNMS) and the Salish Sea off Vancouver Island British Columbia, with the goal to publish guides to be distributed to other researchers and the public through a citizen science philosphy. Both areas exhibit different species diversity based on physical dynamics of ocean patterns. Collaboration and citizen science is important for the productivity and efficiency of future research. Our goal is to continue this project year-around and to present our research work at the 22nd Biennial Society for Marine Mammalogy Conference in Halifax, Nova Scotia in October 2017.

  Please contribute to this important research. By doing so, you become the most critical part of our project by supporting our team to learn more about the many species of toothed cetaceans in the MBNMS. We need to research more about the species and the habitat they live in so that we can discover and understand the behavior and ecology,
with addition of helping protect them from growing threats.

 

 

 

 

 

The project consists of collecting data on photo-identification, occurrence patterns, and foraging behavior of toothed cetaceans (whales and dolphins) inhabiting the waters of the Pacific Northwest. Two areas we are comparing are Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (MBNMS) and the Salish Sea off Vancouver Island British Columbia, with the goal to publish guides to be distributed to other researchers and the public through a citizen science philosphy. Both areas exhibit different species diversity based on physical dynamics of ocean patterns. Collaboration and citizen science is important for the productivity and efficiency of future research. Our goal is to continue this project year-around and to present our research work at the 22nd Biennial Society for Marine Mammalogy Conference in Halifax, Nova Scotia in October 2017.

 

 

Please contribute to this important research. By doing so, you become the most critical part of our project by supporting our team to learn more about the many species of toothed cetaceans in the MBNMS. We need to research more about the species and the habitat they live in so that we can discover and understand the behavior and ecology, with addition of helping protect them from growing threats.